Friday, October 9, 2015

Chicago: Sixteen - Autumn Menu

 Autumn Menu 2015
Food In Progress: Assessing an American Food Revolution

Canapes in seed box

Radishes in edible soil

Mackerel with pumpkin

Pumpkin gel, juice

The Harvest

Panna Cotta of Heirloom Corn and Ossetra Caviar

Shaved Root Vegetable, Pistachio, Hay Frost

Matsutake Mushroom, Green Apple and Cured Mackerel

Dashi broth used to cook the matsutake mushrooms

Whole Roasted Pumpkin with its Natural Juices

The Sea

Canning: A Study in Preservation
Lightly Cured Sea Trout and Roe, Arugula and Sea Lettuce

Bread pairing: Brioche buns with goat butter

Fish: A Rising Demand, a Rising Cost

Now a Global Demand and a Global Issue
Dover Sole with Chestnuts, Celeriac and Vin Jaune

Shellfish: A Bounty Lost, a Lesson Learned

The Cost of Demand, a Lesson Learned
Roast Lobster with Pine, Succulents and Nora Pepper Romesco

The Field

The Third Plate
Barley Porridge, Escargot, Mustard Greens and Juice

The Revival of Lost Varietals
Carolina Gold Rice Congee, Sorghum and Country Ham

The Ranch

Poultry: A Chicken in Every Pot

The Price of Abundance
Breast of Young Hen, Australian Black Truffle, Lemon Confit and Braised Leek

A Way Forward from the Ways of Our Past
Hen's Thigh and Oyster, Apricot Mostarda, Calabrian Chili and Parmesan

Beef: A Battle for the Center of the Plate

The Heart of the American Meal
Smoked Beef Rib, Rye, Pickled Cucumber, Shallot Puree and Wasabi-Infused Devonshire Cream

A Change in the Dinner Plate
Miso Roasted Eggplant, Caramelized Onion, Beef Tongue and Fried Garlic Roots

The Bounty

Earl Grey Tea Granite, African Blue Basil and Cherry Consomme

Stone fruit: Our Desire vs. Nature's Intent
Chocolate-Coconut Gateau, Pluot-Chili Jam,
Confit Chili and Coconut Marshmallow

Donut Peach Pie, Frangipane, Candied Almonds and Lemon Balm-Lychee Sorbet

Tea: Seeking What Was Lost
Matcha Genoise, Ricotta Cream and Raspberry Milk Jelly

Mint and Goat Cheese, Compressed Watermelon,
Domaine de Canton Tapioca and Brown Butter Streusel

Mignardises

Dining partner, Betty

This is a extra long post since my work colleague Betty, a fellow foodie, joined me for dinner. We were able to have everything on the tasting menu by picking opposite items. There were a few stand out dishes, particularly the "vegetable dish that tasted like a meat". We can all agree that any vegetable dish that can taste like meat is impressive. 

I was a little disappointed that the bread pairing was cut short to two servings (I forgot to take a photo of the second pairing). Sixteen served a pretzel roll and I think it should be a permanent pairing on every menu. In comparison, Atera in New York also serves a bread pairing AND offers multiple servings. I wasn't afraid to ask for more bread.

While the tasting menu was solid, I felt I had a better experience during the winter menu. The service was stiff this time around and the wait time for some the courses seemed off. Betty wasn't fond of the desserts and I agree. It wasn't cohesive or inventive with the theme of the meal. The matcha was definitely an afterthought and not the star of the dish.

Will I come back? I rarely come back to a restaurant more than twice but I will keep a close eye on any new developments at Sixteen. I think it has the potential to be a *** Michelin restaurant but the operations from the food and staff need to stay consistent.

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